Roger Police

  • Check with the Better Business Bureau before doing business with another company, especially for pay-by-cash business deals.
  • Reduce and limit the amount of money kept in cash registers. A survey of convicts sentenced to prison on robbery charges revealed that "amount of money available to steal" was the primary reason in selecting which business to hold-up.
  • Remove clutter, posters and signs from windows. They reduce visibility of the store from the outside.
  • Keep the store neat. From the outside looking in, a messy store is usually a sign of little or no security systems and an easier prey for would-be thieves.
  • Staff should be trained in crime prevention techniques and how to properly and safely respond to crisis.
  • Shelving should be low enough for staff to adequately monitor the store from a central location. Elevate the floor behind the till and install mirrors.
  • Move cash registers from the back of the store to the front and, if possible, in a position where tellers can see and be seen from the street.
  • Video surveillance is a must. Even a fake camera will deter theft.
  • Employees steal too. While it is true that employees steal far less frequently than strangers, when employee's do steal, they tend to steal much more than the stranger. Be aware of the opportunities for employee theft and try to reduce them.Shoplifting
  • Use a double-approval system for merchandise refunds, whereby an employee requires a counter-signature from another before authorizing cash refunds to clients. This will eliminate most employee bogus refund frauds.
  • Keep an eye on your store's immediate perimeter. Remove debris such as stones or bricks which could be used to break a window or vandalize.

  • High-technology businesses should be wary of economic theft. Competitive bids, trade or marketing secrets and other corporate information are valuable assets to sophisticated thieves. If travelling abroad, try to arrange your meetings in your country's consulate.
  • Back up your computer data. Computers are valuable commodities in the stolen goods market. It is bad enough to have your computer stolen but if you have not backed up your corporate data such as accounting or client records, you're twice bitten. Back up your hard-drive daily and store the backup away from your computer equipment to minimize the loss.
  • Check with your insurance agent to make sure your office equipment is insured against theft (eg. computers).
  • Mark office equipment with identification engravings, to make them less attractive on the stolen-goods market. Some police forces will lend the engraving equipment for free. Others have state-of-the-art engraving equipment, leaving an invisible code on each piece of equipment, which is entered into a police database. If the equipment turns up as a result of subsequent criminal investigations, the equipment can be returned.
  • Retail outlets should research electronic article merchandising systems which require attaching a tag to each item. If someone attempts to remove the item from the store without clearance from the teller, a loud alarm goes off.
  • Look into community retail crime prevention organization. Some similar organizations engage in support activities, publishing crime prevention handbooks, giving security seminars and warning its membership of crimes and criminals which have recently plagued the neighborhood. If well organized, these almost always result in a reduction in local retail crime.
  • The laws on citizen arrest vary from country to country. One policy that is not recommended is the use of force against an armed thief except in self-defence situations. Do not argue or make any sudden movements. The only objective in these situations is your survival.