"There is not in this country one rule by which the rich are governed, and another for the poor. No man has justice meted out to him by a different measure on account of his rank or fortune, from what would be done if he were destitute of both. Every invasion of property is judged of by the same rule. Every injury is compensated in the same way. And every crime is restrained by the same punishment, be the condition of the offender what it may. It is in this along that true equality can exist in society."

While these words ring eloquent, as issued by Justice Francis Buller during the 1798 trial of the Reverend James O'Coigly of Ireland, O'Coigly was hanged.

Further, England then and still today, institutionally celebrates class and wealth distinctions. Titles are still granted not on merit but on birthright.

In 1798, a titled elite could demand to be tried not by the common courts, but by his peers, the House of Lords.

One rule by which the rich are governed, and another for the poor.

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