Duhaime's Law Dictionary


Allonge Definition:

A piece of paper which has been attached to a contract, a check or any promissory note, on which to add signatures because there is not enough room on the main document.

Related Terms: Bill of Exchange, Promissory Note

Article 13 of the Uniform Law on Bills of Exchange and Promissory Notes, annexed to the Geneva Convention of June 7, 1930, entitled Convention Providing a Uniform Law on Bills of Exchange and Promissory Notes

"An endorsement must be written on the bill of exchange or on a slip affixed thereto (allonge). It must be signed by the endorser."

According to John Bouvier's 1897 Law Dictionary, an allonge is:

"A piece of paper annexed to a bill of exchange or promissory note, on which to write endorsements for which there is no room on the instrument itself."

In Estrada v River Oaks, Justice Coulson of the Court of Civil Appeals of Texas relied on these words:

"[A] purported indorsement on a mortgage or other separate paper pinned or clipped to an instrument is not sufficient for negotiation. The indorsement must be on the instrument itself or on a paper intended for the purpose which is so firmly affixed to the instrument as to become an extension or part of it. Such a paper is called an allonge.

"An allonge (is) a piece of paper annexed to a bill of exchange or promissory note, on which to write endorsements for which there is no room on the instrument itself.

"Historically, when a promissory note was so covered with prior indorsements that no space remained for the indorsement of the last holder, a piece of paper was pasted or fastened by wafer to the bottom of the note to provide space for additional indorsements."

In Byles on Bills of Exchange, the author writes:

"It is essential to the validity of an indorsement that it should be on the back of a bill or note. It may equally well be on the face. But since there is no legal limit to the number of indorsements, there may be no room to write them all on the bill itself. The supernumerary indorsements may, therefore, as above provided, be written on a slip of paper annexed to the bill called an allonge, or partly on both. An allonge is thenceforth part of the bill...."

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